pages & pints

Yes. Please.
theatlantic:

Here’s Exactly How Much the Government Would Have to Spend to Make Public College Tuition-Free

A mere $62.6 billion dollars!
According to new Department of Education data, that’s how much tuition public colleges collected from undergraduates in 2012 in the entire United States. And I’m not being facetious with the word mere, either. The New America Foundation says that the federal government spent a whole $69 billion in 2013 on its hodgepodge of financial aid programs, such as Pell Grants for low-income students, tax breaks, work study funding. And that doesn’t even include loans.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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Yes. Please.

theatlantic:

Here’s Exactly How Much the Government Would Have to Spend to Make Public College Tuition-Free

A mere $62.6 billion dollars!

According to new Department of Education data, that’s how much tuition public colleges collected from undergraduates in 2012 in the entire United States. And I’m not being facetious with the word mere, either. The New America Foundation says that the federal government spent a whole $69 billion in 2013 on its hodgepodge of financial aid programs, such as Pell Grants for low-income students, tax breaks, work study funding. And that doesn’t even include loans.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The Critics' Best Book of 2013

acaseforbooks:

There are a lot of “Best of” lists to look at around this time of the year so I rounded up 20 of the most prominent lists that are already out and here are the books that are mentioned the most:

1. Life After Life by Kate Atkinson
2. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
3. The Lowland by Jhumpa…

ah, the power of aggregation…

too cool!
theatlantic:

The Evolution of the College Library

University of Cambridge academic James W. P. Campbell and Will Pryce, the award winning architectural photographer, have spent the last three years visiting 84 libraries in 21 countries, compiling a history of library design from the ancient world to the present day. The Library: A World History covers the development of university libraries across the world, as well as public and private libraries. Here we provide a selection of key moments in the history of the development of academic libraries.
While we speak of libraries everywhere being under threat, university libraries are coping with ever greater quantities of printed material created by the digital age. Architecturally they are changing, too.
Read more.

View high resolution

too cool!

theatlantic:

The Evolution of the College Library

University of Cambridge academic James W. P. Campbell and Will Pryce, the award winning architectural photographer, have spent the last three years visiting 84 libraries in 21 countries, compiling a history of library design from the ancient world to the present day. The Library: A World History covers the development of university libraries across the world, as well as public and private libraries. Here we provide a selection of key moments in the history of the development of academic libraries.

While we speak of libraries everywhere being under threat, university libraries are coping with ever greater quantities of printed material created by the digital age. Architecturally they are changing, too.

Read more.

afootballreport:

What do we know about concussions? Not enough.

Arsene Wenger did the math for us. “You have only one life,” Arsenal’s manager told reporters, “and you have 60 games per year.”  He was here before, just weeks before. Midfielder Mathieu Flamini clashed heads with a defender and collapsed on the pitch. That time, Wenger did not hesitate to take Flamini out of the game. This time, the doctors didn’t tell him anything about Wojciech Szczesny. They needed just 82 seconds to check his signs and ask the relevant questions: Where are we right now? Who scored last? Which half is it?

The Arsenal goalkeeper had fallen down, seemingly unconscious, lying on the ground with his hands up. This time, Wenger’s player pushed on – Szczesny made some more saves and looked fine, a victory alone even in a game that Arsenal lost to Manchester United.

Doctors say there is no average: Every case is different. Minutes later, Nemanja Vidic, United’s captain, smacked his head against his own goalkeeper’s thigh. This was worse. As he fell to the ground, Vidic looked glassy-eyed, a vacant look on his face. He wobbled off the field, left for the hospital, and on Monday he was released.

The earliest Vidic can play is November 24. By virtue of his club’s schedule, he will automatically get to sit out at least five days – the minimum for any player concussed in the Premier League. But the waiting could last. We just don’t know how long.

And this was just the latest incident in England, if handled a little better. Only last week, Hugo Lloris, the Tottenham goalkeeper, took a knee to the face. The whiplash was violent: The head snapped back, and he was out. Minutes passed before he got up, and when he was told he had to go off, Lloris looked like a man insulted. The manager, Andre Villas-Boas, liked what he saw, the determination and the fight to stay in the game, and so Lloris remained, and he made a couple more saves.

“The call always belongs to me,” said Villas-Boas. He wasn’t immediately given signs from the doctors that indicted Lloris could continue, and yet he did. Villas-Boas didn’t even heed the weak rules already in place: That a player knocked unconscious should not play that same day.

It seems like an epidemic. Concussions make up 11% of injuries in football, or at least that’s the finding in last year’s British Journal of Sports Medicine. An average of one player per squad takes a hit to the head every month. It’s happening a lot more at the highest level, and more than 50% of clubs in England don’t follow the guidelines. They are talking about it, at meetings between FIFA, the International Ice Hockey Federation, the International Olympic Committee and the NFL. But are they doing enough?

Read More

Admittedly, I’ve only watched the first 8:42, but I’m already hooked. Such a great conversation about technology, culture, ideology (very STS) between Shirky and Franzen. Must share immediately! Can’t wait to finish the full 1:28:20 before encouraging others to watch.

newyorker:

Is technology good for culture? At The New Yorker Festival 2013, Jonathan Franzen and Clay Shirky speak with Henry Finder: http://nyr.kr/16tTR3D

(Source: newyorker.com)

BBW

it’s banned books week! celebrate your freedom to read!

participate in an event in your state during banned books week.

read one or all of the frequently challenged books of 2012-2013.

how can you protect your (and others’!) right to read?

stay informed! challenge censorship! support your local schools and libraries!

image and words courtesy of ala-con

I’m really enjoying the new education section of The Atlantic. Loads of thought-provoking articles to help me maintain research momentum and intellectual drive while fitting together the pieces of my dissertation. Just came across this article the nicely blends technological and educational questions (similar is someways to what I’m doing).
Here’s an impressive bit from the article:

“What I immediately realized was, not only were they getting the content, but they were applying it, and then either bringing new content to the classroom — content I wasn’t aware of — or they were asking me questions about the application of the content, questions that provided a richness that we could never explore when I was too busy lecturing,” Mumper said.

The real pièce de résistance of the article arrives in the bottom of the page:

He continued, speculating on our current ed-tech ecosystem. We’re surrounded by new digital technology, and companies are leaping in to try to apply it to the classroom. Reich wonders whether they asking the wrong questions. Are they starting from the wrong place?
“Are we seeing the limits of teacher-centered content delivery?” he wrote. “With all of the technologies now available to us, should we be content with a two percent gain on final exams?

Which leads into a pivotal area of inquiry; one that the article (as many do) leaves largely unaddressed. What should we (institutions, administrators, educators, students, etc.) be more concerned with: technologies or pedagogies?
Head over to The Atlantic to read the entire article.
theatlantic:

The Post-Lecture Classroom: How Will Students Fare?

If college professors spent less time lecturing, would their students do better?
A three-year study examining student performance in a “flipped classroom” — a class in which students watch short lecture videos at home and work on activities during class time — has found statistically significant gains in student performance in “flipped” settings and significant student preference for “flipped” methods.
The study, provided exclusively to The Atlantic, is one of the first to examine a “flipped” classroom in the current state of its technology. Russell Mumper, a Vice Dean at the University of North Carolina’s Eshelman School of Pharmacy, conducted the study, and two separate articles based on its findings are now in press in the journals Academic Medicine and The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. The education technology company Echo360, whose technology was used in the classes examined, funded the study with a $10,000 grant.
The study examined three years of a foundational pharmaceutics course, required for all doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students attending UNC. In 2011, Mumper taught the course in a standard, PowerPoint-aided lecture format. In 2012 and 2013, he taught it using “flipped” methods. Student performance on an identical final exam improved by 2.5 percent between 2011 and 2012—results now in press at Academic Medicine—and by an additional 2.6 percent in 2013. Overall, student performance on an identical final exam improved between 2011 and 2013 by 5.1 percent.
Students also came to prefer the flipped model to the lecture model. While 75 percent of students in 2012 said, before Mumper’s class, that they preferred lectures, almost 90 percent of students said they preferred the flipped model after the class.
“As I always like to say, we flipped their preference,” Mumper told me. “They went from largely wanting and valuing lectures to just the opposite.”
Read more. [Image: Echo360]

View high resolution

I’m really enjoying the new education section of The Atlantic. Loads of thought-provoking articles to help me maintain research momentum and intellectual drive while fitting together the pieces of my dissertation. Just came across this article the nicely blends technological and educational questions (similar is someways to what I’m doing).

Here’s an impressive bit from the article:

“What I immediately realized was, not only were they getting the content, but they were applying it, and then either bringing new content to the classroom — content I wasn’t aware of — or they were asking me questions about the application of the content, questions that provided a richness that we could never explore when I was too busy lecturing,” Mumper said.

The real pièce de résistance of the article arrives in the bottom of the page:

He continued, speculating on our current ed-tech ecosystem. We’re surrounded by new digital technology, and companies are leaping in to try to apply it to the classroom. Reich wonders whether they asking the wrong questions. Are they starting from the wrong place?

“Are we seeing the limits of teacher-centered content delivery?” he wrote. “With all of the technologies now available to us, should we be content with a two percent gain on final exams?

Which leads into a pivotal area of inquiry; one that the article (as many do) leaves largely unaddressed. What should we (institutions, administrators, educators, students, etc.) be more concerned with: technologies or pedagogies?

Head over to The Atlantic to read the entire article.

theatlantic:

The Post-Lecture Classroom: How Will Students Fare?

If college professors spent less time lecturing, would their students do better?

A three-year study examining student performance in a “flipped classroom” — a class in which students watch short lecture videos at home and work on activities during class time — has found statistically significant gains in student performance in “flipped” settings and significant student preference for “flipped” methods.

The study, provided exclusively to The Atlantic, is one of the first to examine a “flipped” classroom in the current state of its technology. Russell Mumper, a Vice Dean at the University of North Carolina’s Eshelman School of Pharmacy, conducted the study, and two separate articles based on its findings are now in press in the journals Academic Medicine and The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. The education technology company Echo360, whose technology was used in the classes examined, funded the study with a $10,000 grant.

The study examined three years of a foundational pharmaceutics course, required for all doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students attending UNC. In 2011, Mumper taught the course in a standard, PowerPoint-aided lecture format. In 2012 and 2013, he taught it using “flipped” methods. Student performance on an identical final exam improved by 2.5 percent between 2011 and 2012—results now in press at Academic Medicine—and by an additional 2.6 percent in 2013. Overall, student performance on an identical final exam improved between 2011 and 2013 by 5.1 percent.

Students also came to prefer the flipped model to the lecture model. While 75 percent of students in 2012 said, before Mumper’s class, that they preferred lectures, almost 90 percent of students said they preferred the flipped model after the class.

“As I always like to say, we flipped their preference,” Mumper told me. “They went from largely wanting and valuing lectures to just the opposite.”

Read more. [Image: Echo360]

Yes! More, please.

Although in a slightly different vein, this reminds me of Brooke Gladstone’s (with illustrations by Josh Neufeld) The Influencing Machine (which I wholeheartedly recommend). Well researched and full of anecdotes, Gladstone’s text is a great look (ever more so thanks to the many fine images from Neufeld) at the complex history (including the present and possible future[s]) of media. The witty and humorous narrator guides readers from Caesar’s Rome through an interconnected web (historical events, interviews with key thinkers, brilliant commentary, etc.) and ultimately offers a thoughtful (and thought-provoking) (re)consideration of our contemporary (collective and individual) relationship with instantaneous and immersive media.

Definitely worth a read — it’s a scholarly comic book for crying out loud!

The Influencing Machine cover image

explore-blog:

Artist Paul Rogers, who illustrated the lovely children’s book based on Bob Dylan’s Forever Young, illustrates every page of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road – the best thing since every page of Moby-Dick illustrated and a fine addition to these visual takes on literary classics.

( this isn’t happiness)

Yes, please.

polerstuff:

(via POLER X STUMPTOWN CAMP COFFEE KIT | Poler Stuff)
We are super excited to bring you this #campcoffee kit with our friends Stumptown Coffee ! Perfect for camping or traveling. Awesome for making coffee in your hotel room or anywhere! Never drink crap coffee again! #campvibes

Yes, please.

polerstuff:

(via POLER X STUMPTOWN CAMP COFFEE KIT | Poler Stuff)

We are super excited to bring you this #campcoffee kit with our friends Stumptown Coffee ! Perfect for camping or traveling. Awesome for making coffee in your hotel room or anywhere! Never drink crap coffee again! #campvibes

This is an extraordinary time for the understanding of the human condition. Intellectual problems from antiquity are being illuminated by insights from the sciences of mind, brain, genes, and evolution. Powerful tools have been developed to explore them, from genetically engineered neurons that can be controlled with pinpoints of light to the mining of “big data” as a means of understanding how ideas propagate.

One would think that writers in the humanities would be delighted and energized by the efflorescence of new ideas from the sciences. But one would be wrong. Though everyone endorses science when it can cure disease, monitor the environment, or bash political opponents, the intrusion of science into the territories of the humanities has been deeply resented.

If anything is naïve and simplistic, it is the conviction that the legacy silos of academia should be fortified and that we should be forever content with current ways of making sense of the world. Surely our conceptions of politics, culture, and morality have much to learn from our best understanding of the physical universe and of our makeup as a species.

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