msuteal
msuteal:

Celebrate the freedom to read!
TONIGHT (22 Sept 2014) from 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Join authors, librarians, booksellers, journalists, educators, readers, and book enthusiasts of all sorts for celebration of comics and graphic novels! Make space on your calendar and head over to the Bozeman Public Library for a memorable and important event.
Banned Books Week not only promotes awareness of challenges to literature, but also celebrates freedom of speech and emphasizes the importance necessity of free and open access to information.

msuteal:

Celebrate the freedom to read!

TONIGHT (22 Sept 2014) from 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Join authors, librarians, booksellers, journalists, educators, readers, and book enthusiasts of all sorts for celebration of comics and graphic novels! Make space on your calendar and head over to the Bozeman Public Library for a memorable and important event.

Banned Books Week not only promotes awareness of challenges to literature, but also celebrates freedom of speech and emphasizes the importance necessity of free and open access to information.

powells
Herein lies the power of a phrase as straightforward (but simultaneously complex) as, “So it goes.”
thetinhouse:

Kurt always says it best.

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

Herein lies the power of a phrase as straightforward (but simultaneously complex) as, “So it goes.”

thetinhouse:

Kurt always says it best.

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

npr
nprbooks:

asymptotejournal:

"With the Real World Cup (RWC) kicking off Thursday afternoon, it’s time to announce the participants in this year’s World Cup of Literature (WCL)” —Chad Post at Three Percent
Don’t miss out on this exciting tournament of books! Read about the participants, the judges and more here. 

I could totally get into this bracket. (And I’m pretty sure that’s the first time I’ve ever said that about anything.)
-Nicole


World Cup and books, what could be better?! It’s going to be an awesome month!

nprbooks:

asymptotejournal:

"With the Real World Cup (RWC) kicking off Thursday afternoon, it’s time to announce the participants in this year’s World Cup of Literature (WCL)” —Chad Post at Three Percent

Don’t miss out on this exciting tournament of books! Read about the participants, the judges and more here.

I could totally get into this bracket. (And I’m pretty sure that’s the first time I’ve ever said that about anything.)

-Nicole

World Cup and books, what could be better?! It’s going to be an awesome month!

theatlantic
Yes. Please.
theatlantic:

Here’s Exactly How Much the Government Would Have to Spend to Make Public College Tuition-Free

A mere $62.6 billion dollars!
According to new Department of Education data, that’s how much tuition public colleges collected from undergraduates in 2012 in the entire United States. And I’m not being facetious with the word mere, either. The New America Foundation says that the federal government spent a whole $69 billion in 2013 on its hodgepodge of financial aid programs, such as Pell Grants for low-income students, tax breaks, work study funding. And that doesn’t even include loans.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Yes. Please.

theatlantic:

Here’s Exactly How Much the Government Would Have to Spend to Make Public College Tuition-Free

A mere $62.6 billion dollars!

According to new Department of Education data, that’s how much tuition public colleges collected from undergraduates in 2012 in the entire United States. And I’m not being facetious with the word mere, either. The New America Foundation says that the federal government spent a whole $69 billion in 2013 on its hodgepodge of financial aid programs, such as Pell Grants for low-income students, tax breaks, work study funding. And that doesn’t even include loans.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

acaseforbooks

acaseforbooks:

There are a lot of “Best of” lists to look at around this time of the year so I rounded up 20 of the most prominent lists that are already out and here are the books that are mentioned the most:

1. Life After Life by Kate Atkinson
2. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
3. The Lowland by Jhumpa…

ah, the power of aggregation…